2018 NCNSFPE Fire Protection Engineering Seminar

San Ramon Valley Conference Center

3301 Crow Canyon Road, San Ramon, CA 94583

March 28, 2018, 8 am – 3:30 pm

On March 28, 2018, the Northern California-Nevada Chapter of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers is hosting the 2018 Fire Protection Engineering Seminar. The seminar will include a variety of educational presentations representing the current fire protection industry and a panel discussion including fire protection experts from California. In addition, the seminar will host a fire safety technology fair showcasing new technologies in the fire protection engineering industry.

Agenda

8:00 to 9:00 am        Registration

9:00 to 9:45 am        Components and Consequences of Cross-Laminated Timber Delamination

                                 Richard Emberley, PhD, Assistant Professor of Fire Protection Engineering 

9:45 to 10:55 am      Human Behavior in Fire and the Revised SFPE Guide

                                 Chris Jelenewicz, P.E., FSFPE, SFPE International Technical Director

10:55 to 11:10 am    Break

11:10 to 11:50 am    State of California, Office of the State Fire Marshal - Programs Update

Greg Andersen, Division Chief, Code Development and Analysis

11:50 to 1:00 pm      Lunch Provided

Fire safety technology fair will take place during lunch and throughout the day

1:00 to 2:10 pm        Wildfire Modeling and Risk of Potential Structure Loss
Christopher Lautenberger, PhD, P.E, Principle at Reax Engineering Inc.

2:10 to 2:20 pm        Break

2:20 to 3:20 pm        Panel Discussion. Fire protection industry topics will be discussed.

                     More information to be provided soon!

3:20 to 3:30 pm        Closing remarks

                                

Cost

Proceeds from which will fund chapter scholarships for fire protection engineering students.

Save up to 40% by registering before March 19th!

 

Description Preregister by March 19th Register after March 19th
Full day with breakfast and lunch
       General Public $150 $200
        NCN-SFPE Chapter Member $125 $175
       Student $80 $130

Please visit the chapter web site www.ncnsfpe.org to register using PayPal, or mail a check made out to NCNSFPE at 1839 Ygnacio Valley Rd., Box 240, Walnut Creek, CA 94598. Questions? Contact Connor McGill at cmcgill@thefireconsultants.com


 [CD1]To attract the FPOs I would change this to a less technical title, such as “Wildfire Modeling and Risk of Potential Structure Loss”.  Check in with Chris to verify he is OK with a change for the flier. 

FYI: When do you sprinkler Closets

in Dorms, Apts, Condos?

By James E. Art, Fire Protection Engineer

Q. “Do you need sprinklers in the Closets in Dormitories,

Apartments, Condos, Nursing Homes, etc.?

A. Per NFPA 13 (2016)the answer is “Yes - Always.”

Some Code Excerpts of interest:

Excerpts below are from NFPA 13 (2016 edition), currently enforced in California.

Note that an asterisk (“*”) indicates information in the Annex.

4.1 Level of Protection

A building, where protected by an automatic sprinkler system installation, shall be provided with sprinklers in all areas except where specific sections of this standard permit the omission of sprinklers.

Here is one such exception:

8.15.8.2* Closets and Pantries. Sprinklers are not required in clothes closets, linen closets, pantries within dwelling units in hotels and motels where the area of the space does not exceed 24 sq. ft … and the walls and ceilings are surfaced with noncombustible or limited combustible materials.

Note that this exception is different for hotels and motels than for other residential occupancies. More combustibles may be expected where more extended occupancy is likely, such as dormitories, apartments, condos,  live-work, etc. The 2013 Edition of NFPA 13 included a 3 foot least dimension requirement no longer in the Code.

(Here is a different exception for Hospitals, but not nursing homes, see below)

8.15.9* Hospital Clothes Closets.

Sprinklers shall not be required in clothes closets of patient sleeping rooms in hospitals where the area of the closet does not exceed 6 sq. ft, …, provided the distance from the sprinkler in the patient sleeping room to the back wall of the closet does not exceed the maximum distance permitted by 8.5.3.2.

And note the fire sprinkler does not have to be centered:

8.5.5.4 Closets. In all closets and compartments, including those closets housing mechanical equipment, that are not larger than 400 ft3 … in size, a single sprinkler at the highest ceiling level shall be sufficient without regard to obstructions or minimum distance to the wall.

--------------------------------------------------

Clothes are mostly synthetic or blends. It is hard to buy pure cotton or natural materials. And clothes burn hot, fast, and fiercely.

One demonstration: In 1981 researchers used houses near the LA Airport scheduled for demolition, to run actual fire tests to try to help justify the NFPA 13D parameters for a less costly residential system. The system was called a Life Safety System, with a smaller meter, and fewer sprinklers in some areas. They hoped the sprinklers in the larger room would keep a fire in an unsprinklered closet from spreading. They filmed the fires.

One test was a closet fire, with typical clothing on hangers. As the fire started to take off, you can see lots of heavy dark smoke billowing out the top of the door opening, that later become burning gases, like the fire you see extending out of a window in a burning building.

Then you can tell that the camera operator is retreating, getting out of there!

Pretty soon he’s outside the building, filming thru the open door! It was clearly not safe in the room.

They had to call in the fire fighters standing by, to save the building, so they could use it again for more tests!

They did run another test with every fifth clothing article made of wool, and had a much slower fire.

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The answer to this question may be different if NFPA 13D or NFPA 13R are appropriate. Those standards are intended mainly to allow occupants to escape (hence the term “Life Safety Systems.”)  Property protection and fire extinguishing are secondary.

In the California Fire Code, based on the International Fire Code, most of the many important fire sprinkler trade offs such as extra stories or height, increased areas, increased travel distances, reduced fire alarm installations, etc. require the sprinkler system to meet NFPA 13.

Excerpt from CaFC (2016):

903.3.1.1 NFPA 13 sprinkler systems. Where the provisions of this code require that a building or portion thereof be equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with this section, sprinklers shall be installed throughout in accordance with NFPA 13 as amended in Chapter 80 except as provided in Sections 903.3.1.1.1 and 903.3.1.1.2.

903.3.1.1.1 has exemptions for certain areas, including elevator machine rooms.

903.3.1.1.2 allows omission of sprinklers in certain occupancies in bathrooms less than 55 sq. ft, provided the walls and ceilings are non combustible or limited combustible with a thermal rating.

----------------------------------------

About the Author:

 

James E. Art is a Registered Fire Protection Engineer with over 25 years of experience. A graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology Fire Protection Engineering program, he does Expert Witness work; Design Review,  and Inspections for cities, architects, engineers; Code Consulting; High Piled Storage Reports; Alternate Means and Methods Requests; Hydraulic Calculations; and Design of Fixed Fire Extinguishing systems. You may contact him in California by phone at 925-846-5060

A similar version of this article was published in the Oct 2017 Fire Protection Contractor magazine, visit their website at www.fpcmag.com

The State Fire Marshal's Office has announced a kick-off meeting to review the current provisions of the codes in relationship to Group L occupancy requirements. Group L allows an alternate method of design for research labs that have regulated hazardous materials in excess of that permitted by the control area concept in Section 414. Without these provisions research laboratories would be limited to the first three floor levels above grade plane to have sufficient amount of regulated hazardous materials to conduct their operations or would have to be classified as a Group H occupancy. The Group L occupancy is a California created occupancy classification which became part of the 2007 California Codes and has not have a review or significant update since this time of introduction.

SFM would like to have persons participate in this review from all perspectives of users, developers, building owners, architects and those responsible for enforcement .At this time there is not a representative from a local building department and such individual would be extremely helpful. SFM is actually interested in having individuals having any form of interest in the review process and therefore has established a Web conference for those that may not be able to attend the actual Sacramento meeting.

This meeting  will be held August 221 to 4 PM at SFM Headquarters in Sacramento.

If you like to join the conference call: Call in 888-251-2909 Participant: 204798

cventonlinelearningII

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING PE EXAM REVIEW
 

*2018 dates for this exam review course will be announced shortly.*

The online PE exam review course is an excellent preparation tool to prepare you for the Fire Protection Engineering PE Exam. The online PE exam course has been revised to meet the current NCEES exam specifications. You will be able to access 14 live, 1.5 hour sessions from anywhere. Each session is taught by a subject matter expert, using web conferencing technology, which will allow you the opportunity to ask questions as they arise throughout each session. This effective educational online prep course will help you organize and navigate through the reference materials and allow for maximum retention.

Who Should Attend

Anyone preparing for the PE Exam, or anyone needing a refresher including existing engineers, fire marshals, and loss control specialists: participants will come away with the understanding of the principles of fire protection engineering, and even if you are not taking the exam this year, but want to assess your readiness for a future exam, this online PE exam prep course will provide you with a fundamental understanding of the principles of fire protection engineering.

Topics

  • Exam Preparation & Exam Taking Strategies
  • Fire Protection Analysis
  • Fire Protection Management
  • Human Behavior
  • Fire Dynamics
  • Fire Protection System
  • Smoke Management
  • Explosion Protection
  • Passive Building Systems

Enrollment Includes

  • Participation in either the Tuesday or Thursday session
  • Two-hours of access to instructors outside class hours
  • Electronic copies of the online PE exam prep training slides 

Schedule

14 live, 1.5 hour online sessions:

*exact dates to be determined shortly

  • July - October, 2018 (Every Tuesday) from 2:30 - 4:00 PM Eastern Time
  • July - October, 2018 (Every Thursday) from 6:30 - 8:00 PM Eastern Time

You have the flexibility to attend the Tuesday or Thursday session each week.

Fees

  • Member of SFPE HQ: TBD for 2018
  • Non-Member: TBD for 2018

Reading Requirements

Continuing Education Credits

Professional Development Hours (PDHs) are only granted for the sessions in which you fully participate. Your participation is verified by being logged into the web conference technology during the session. The maximum number of PDHs that can be awarded for the 14 weeks is 21 PDHs, even if the sessions run long or you attend a Tuesday and Thursday session in a given week. Recordings of the sessions are available in case you miss a session or if you wish to listen to the session again, however no PDHs credit can be given to sessions that were missed and then made up by listening to the recording. These rules are necessary to maintain the integrity of the PDH granting process.